The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe By Cs Lewis Pdf

the lion the witch and the wardrobe by cs lewis pdf

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I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still.

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PDF Download The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia, #2) Full Description

I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.

You can then take it down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to understand a word you say, but I shall still be.

Lucy Looks into a Wardrobe II. Edmund and the Wardrobe IV. Turkish Delight V. Into the Forest VII. What Happened after Dinner IX. In the Witch's House X. The Triumph of the Witch XV. The Hunting of the White Stag.

Once there were four children whose names were Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy. This story is about something that happened to them when they were sent away from London during the war because of the air-raids. They were sent to the house of an old Professor who lived in the heart of the country, ten miles from the nearest railway station and two miles from the nearest post office. He had no wife and he lived in a very large house with a housekeeper called Mrs. Macready and three servants.

Their names were Ivy, Margaret and Betty, but they do not come into the story much. He himself was a very old man with shaggy white hair, which grew over most of his face as well as on his head, and they liked him almost at once; but on the first evening when he came out to meet them at the front door he was so odd-looking that Lucy who was the youngest was a little afraid of him, and Edmund who was the next youngest wanted to laugh and had to keep on pretending he was blowing his nose to hide it.

As soon as they had said good night to the Professor and gone upstairs on the first night, the boys came into the girls' room and they all talked it over.

That old chap will let us do anything we like. Go to bed yourself. Anyway, they won't hear us. It's about ten minutes' walk from here down to that dining room, and any amount of stairs and passages in between. It was a far larger house than she had ever been in before and the thought of all those long passages and rows of doors leading into empty rooms was beginning to make her feel a little creepy.

I shall go to bed now. I say, let's go and explore to-morrow. You might find anything in a place like this. Did you see those mountains as we came along?

And the woods? There might be eagles. There might be stags. There'll be hawks. But when next morning came, there was a steady rain falling, so thick that when you looked out of the window you could see neither the mountains nor the woods nor even the stream in the garden.

They had just finished breakfast with the Professor and were upstairs in the room he had set apart for them—a long, low room with two windows looking out in one direction and two in another. And in the meantime we're pretty well off. There's a wireless and lots of books. Everyone agreed to this and that was how the adventures began. It was the sort of house that you never seem to come to the end of, and it was full of unexpected places.

The first few doors they tried led only into spare bedrooms, as everyone had expected that they would; but soon they came to a very long room full of pictures and there they found a suit of armour; and after that was a room all hung with green, with a harp in one corner; and then came three steps down and five steps up, and then a kind of little upstairs hall and a door that led out onto a balcony, and then a whole series of rooms that led into each other and were lined with books—most of them very old books and some bigger than a Bible in a church.

And shortly after that they looked into a room that was quite empty except for one big wardrobe; the sort that has a looking-glass in the door. There was nothing else in the room at all except a dead blue-bottle on the window-sill. She stayed behind because she thought it would be worth while trying the door of the wardrobe, even though she felt almost sure that it would be locked. To her surprise it opened quite easily, and two moth-balls dropped out.

Looking into the inside, she saw several coats hanging up—mostly long fur coats. There was nothing Lucy liked so much as the smell and feel of fur. She immediately stepped into the wardrobe and got in among the coats and rubbed her face against them, leaving the door open, of course, because she knew that it is very foolish to shut oneself into any wardrobe.

Soon she went further in and found that there was a second row of coats hanging up behind the first one. It was almost quite dark in there and she kept her arms stretched out in front of her so as not to bump her face into the back of the wardrobe. She took a step further in—then two or three steps—always expecting to feel woodwork against the tips of her fingers. But she could not feel it. Then she noticed that there was something crunching under her feet. But instead of feeling the hard, smooth wood of the floor of the wardrobe, she felt something soft and powdery and extremely cold, "This is very queer," she said, and went on a step or two further.

Next moment she found that what was rubbing against her face and hands was no longer soft fur but something hard and rough and even prickly. And then she saw that there was a light ahead of her; not a few inches away where the back of the wardrobe ought to have been, but a long way off. Something cold and soft was falling on her. A moment later she found that she was standing in the middle of a wood at night-time with snow under her feet and snowflakes falling through the air.

Lucy felt a little frightened, but she felt very inquisitive and excited as well. She looked back over her shoulder and there, between the dark tree-trunks, she could still see the open doorway of the wardrobe and even catch a glimpse of the empty room from which she had set out.

She had, of course, left the door open, for she knew that it is a very silly thing to shut oneself into a wardrobe.

It seemed to be still daylight there. She began to walk forward, crunch-crunch , over the snow and through the wood towards the other light. In about ten minutes she reached it and found that it was a lamp-post. As she stood looking at it, wondering why there was a lamp-post in the middle of a wood and wondering what to do next, she heard a pitter patter of feet coming towards her.

And soon after that a very strange person stepped out from among the trees into the light of the lamp-post. He was only a little taller than Lucy herself and he carried over his head an umbrella, white with snow.

From the waist upwards he was like a man, but his legs were shaped like a goat's the hair on them was glossy black and instead of feet he had goat's hoofs. He also had a tail, but Lucy did not notice this at first because it was neatly caught up over the arm that held the umbrella so as to keep it from trailing in the snow. He had a red woollen muffler round his neck and his skin was rather reddish too. He had a strange, but pleasant little face with a short pointed beard and curly hair, and out of the hair there stuck two horns, one on each side of his forehead.

One of his hands, as I have said, held the umbrella: in the other arm he carried several brown paper parcels. What with the parcels and the snow it looked just as if he had been doing his Christmas shopping.

He was a Faun. And when he saw Lucy he gave such a start of surprise that he dropped all his parcels. But the Faun was so busy picking up his parcels that at first he did not reply.

When he had finished he made her a little bow. I am delighted. That is to say—" and then he stopped as if he had been going to say something he had not intended but had remembered in time. My name is Tumnus. And you—you have come from the wild woods of the west? Tumnus in a rather melancholy voice, "if only I had worked harder at geography when I was a little Faun, I should no doubt know all about those strange countries.

It is too late now. It is summer there. Tumnus, "it is winter in Narnia, and has been for ever so long, and we shall both catch cold if we stand here talking in the snow.

Daughter of Eve from the far land of Spare Oom where eternal summer reigns around the bright city of War Drobe, how would it be if you came and had tea with me?

Tumnus," said Lucy. Tumnus, "I shall be able to hold the umbrella over both of us. That's the way. Now—off we go. And so Lucy found herself walking through the wood arm in arm with this strange creature as if they had known one another all their lives. They had not gone far before they came to a place where the ground became rough and there were rocks all about and little hills up and little hills down.

At the bottom of one small valley Mr. Tumnus turned suddenly aside as if he were going to walk straight into an unusually large rock, but at the last moment Lucy found he was leading her into the entrance of a cave.

As soon as they were inside she found herself blinking in the light of a wood fire. Then Mr. Tumnus stooped and took a flaming piece of wood out of the fire with a neat little pair of tongs, and lit a lamp. Lucy thought she had never been in a nicer place. It was a little, dry, clean cave of reddish stone with a carpet on the floor and two little chairs "one for me and one for a friend," said Mr.

Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 2 PDF, EPUB, DOC

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. How to Download Follow Twitter. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. Lewis, published by Geoffrey Bles in Like the others, it was illustrated by Pauline Baynes, and her work has been retained in many later editions. Most of the novel is set in Narnia, a land of talking animals and mythical creatures that one White Witch has ruled for years of deep winter.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Plot Summary. All Symbols Father Christmas. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts. The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play.

Lucy is the first to find the secret of the wardrobe in the professor's mysterious old house. At first, no one believes her when she tells of her adventures in the land of Narnia. In the blink of an eye, their lives are changed forever. Find the perfect book for you today. Find the perfect book for you today READ. This edition is complete with fullcolor cover and interior art by the original illustrator, Pauline Baynes.


KB·18, Downloads. Narnia_1_-_The_Lion_The_Witch_and_The_W_-_​Lewis_C_.pdf Narnia 1 - The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe Lewis, C.S.


The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. Lewis , published by Geoffrey Bles in It is the first published and best known of seven novels in The Chronicles of Narnia —

Стратмор кивнул: - Это наименьшая из наших проблем. - Не можем ли мы подкупить Танкадо. Я знаю, он нас ненавидит, но что, если предложить ему несколько миллионов долларов. Убедить не выпускать этот шифр из рук. Стратмор рассмеялся: - Несколько миллионов.

The Chronicles of Narnia Books 1–7

Это можно примерно перевести как… - Кто будет охранять охранников! - закончила за него Сьюзан. Беккера поразила ее реакция. - Сьюзан, не знал, что ты… - Это из сатир Ювенала! - воскликнула.  - Кто будет охранять охранников. Иными словами - кто будет охранять Агентство национальной безопасности, пока мы охраняем мир. Это было любимое изречение, которым часто пользовался Танкадо.

Беккер шумно вздохнул и поднял глаза к потолку. Успокойся, Дэвид. Спокойно. Он оглядел пустой зал. Ни души. Продала кольцо и улетела. Он увидел уборщика и подошел к .

The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe by C S Lewis pdf

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